Posts Tagged ‘stencil graffiti’

‘War is Naughty’ Stencil Graffiti, Edward Street, Brighton

WHERE: On the corner of Edward Street and Grand Parade, on the grey building beside Fitzhugh Gates Solicitors

PIECE BY: unknown

LEGAL: No, this graffiti stencil is an art crime.

WE SAY: This stencil is a good piece of graffiti. Not only does it employ the effective method of sending a highly political message via the medium of humour, but it does it in three words “War is naughty”! The horror of war is a common focus of graffiti, and it can be dealt with in many different ways. However, we like this piece as it pokes fun at the ridiculousness of war and is simple enough to stick in the mind. Bravo, we say!

Fuck the System, Brighton Police Station

Fuck the System, Brighton Police Station

Click on the image above to see a larger version

WHERE: On William Street. Just behind Brighton Police Station. This stencil appeared all the way along the back of the police station on the pillars.

PIECE BY: Anon.

LEGAL: No, this is definitely an illegal stencil!

OUR RESIDENT ART EXPERT, SAYS:

Although we’ve seen this self explanatory stencil in numerous places around Brighton, this illegal stencil graffiti is on almost every pillar down William Street on the back of the police station. We like how this graffiti artist has cheekily flirted a very strong anarchist message on the back of the police station itself. They obviously weren’t doing a very good job this day!

Protest Point, London Road

Protest Point, London Road

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WHERE: Just behind London Road. On Providence Place/St. Peter’s Street, just behind London Road and near to St. Bartholomew’s Church.

PIECE BY: Anon.

LEGAL: No, this is an illegal stencil

OUR RESIDENT ART EXPERT, SAYS:

Another anarchist piece of graffiti. This affirms the power of protest – often the only influence we have over government. It is obviously a take on the fire assembly point sign. Although this is a clever stencil, it’s a shame this is tucked so out of the way because not many people will see it!

Chances are it’s still there, much of the graffiti in this area remains in place for a good period of time. Can you find it?

Click on the thumbnails above to see a larger version

WHERE: Red flower: Head down Gloucester Road towards the Old Steine. You will see The Eagle pub on your left hand side. Immediately after the pub there is a mews, and if you turn left into it you notice a small alleyway leading onto Gloucester Street. This is on the same alleyway as the “what if this is it?” graffiti.

Blue flower:  Marine Parade. This piece was (unfortunately) on the side of the old Victorian lift headed down towards Concorde 2.

PIECE BY: Anon.

LEGAL: No.

OUR RESIDENT ART EXPERT, SAYS:

These are beautiful tags. They’re stencils, but are quite intricate so you wouldn’t know it unless you know what to look for. They are a simple but effective take on the common tags that you see everywhere. There may well be more of these graffiti tags around Brighton, but we haven’t spotted any more yet. Have you seen any? Let us know.

Perhaps there are more of these around, and perhaps they are all different colours! It’s nice to see tags that add a bit of colour to the world of vandalism! They may not be around for long so check them out while you still can.

Beggar Boy

 

Beggar Boy

 

Click on the image above to see a larger version

WHERE: Off North Street, on the side of Art Republic, on Bond Street in the Laines.

PIECE BY: Unknown at present – but keep an eye out for the symbol on the bottom right elsewhere.

LEGAL: Unknown. This may be a commission by Art Republic, but given the nature of other graffiti by this artist it could also just be conveniently placed.

OUR RESIDENT ART EXPERT SAYS:

Recognise this? The style is identical to the ‘The Building Wraps Around Me’ stencil graffiti in Jubilee Square, and it has the same tag symbol. It’s exciting when you discover two pieces by the same artist, particularly when it is so sophisticated and has a mysterious air to it such as this. We’re still not sure what the name of this artist is, but the cube symbol is the constant factor here.

This piece appears to show a beggar boy. If so then it could tie in with the other piece we have seen by this artist, the one that looks a bit like Saddam Hussein – this boy could easily be a refugee of war. It’s a solemn piece but also incredibly beautiful and perfectly executed. Pieces like this are the cream of the crop as far as we’re concerned. There is a lot of very good graffiti around Brighton and Sussex, but this pushes the bar right up. The uncertainty about the identity of the artist and even whether or not this is a legal or illegal piece also adds to the mystery. We hope you enjoy it!

Also, note the tag in the bottom right hand corner (we have cut most of it off here I’m afraid) It is the same tag as on the North Street/King Place Rolf Harris graffiti. Whether this is just a separate tag or if the artist had a part in creating this piece of graffiti, we aren’t sure. You decide.

Click on the thumbnails above to see the bigger picture

WHERE: Where the alley running off Church Street meets Jubilee Square. Head up the side alley that leads to the Prince Regent Swimming Pool past all the large pieces of graffiti and this stencil is on the left hand side at about shoulder height just before you reach the swimming pool. It’s easy to miss so keep your eyes peeled!

PIECE BY: Unknown at present – but keep an eye out for the symbol on the left elsewhere.

LEGAL: No. This piece is too obscure and hidden from plain sight to be a commission.

OUR RESIDENT ART EXPERT SAYS:

This is a really superb example of stencil graffiti. In fact you can hardly tell that it is a stencil unless you look very closely. Over the top, it says “The building wraps around me”, and you can interpret this cryptic comment as you see fit. Bear in mind though, that it was added a good time after the initial stencil and is a line from a song by Turin Brakes!

I have no idea how long this piece of graffiti has been here, but the resembelence of the angry ghoulish man to Saddam Hussein is certainly striking.  This suggests that it may have been put up any time from the beginning of the Iraq war to Saddam’s execution. But then again, maybe not, it could just be a coincidence. The man might just be a figment of artist’s imagination. That’s the joy of graffiti, you never can be sure!